Chronic Illness Causes Higher Divorce Rates

Chronic Illness Causes Higher Divorce Rates

Chronic Illness and Divorce Rates

Chronic Illness and Divorce Rates

 

I can understand how Chronic Illness Causes Higher Divorce Rates.

At times, my chronic illness has kept me from moving forward and it is my fault. My chronic illnesses Sheehan’s Syndrome and Relapsing Polychondritis contributes to my innate feeling that life is not fair. The unfairness of my chronically ill world contributes to me not always being able to handle my world well. My emotional gauge has been broken and my measurement of rational  behavior swings wide.

The unfairness of my chronically ill world contributes to me not always being able to handle my world well. My emotional gauge has been broken and my measurement of rational  behavior swings wide.

My life with a chronic illness, especially an invisible chronic illness has been filled with mixed blessings. I am blessed to have my children and husband in my world.

I understand the success rate for  marriage is not same when one spouse has a chronic illness; seventy-five percent of  chronically ill married people end up in divorce. 

Sadly, part of the 25% stays married for health insurance.1

I have been married for almost twenty years. So many times my marriage has been difficult for me to navigate. My husband and I only experienced a very small window in our marriage before days of stressful diseases or medical conditions encompass our lives.

 Each day I  battle whether to tell how my spouse how I really feel. I am tired of myself.

So, it is bittersweet, when my husband inquires about my day, I usually convey:

 Each day I  battle whether to tell how my spouse how I really feel. I am tired of myself. So, it is bittersweet, when my husband inquires about my day, I usually convey:

  • I am Fine
  • I am Good
  • I am OK.

The truth is that I am sick of myself. I feel like my body is a broken record; push, play, push, play, repeat.  I frequently ponder if I should answer with the 

 I frequently ponder if I should answer with the truth:

  • I am frustrated that my bright sides continue to shrink
  • My body throbs in pain and as my cartilage burns inside
  • I am lonely but I am not alone

The reality of a chronic illness is nobody understands you until they have walked your journey. Sometimes, I desperately try to play life forward but I end up on the sidelines. I frequently sigh and I rhetorically question whether” This is my world?”

Sometimes, I desperately try to play life forward but I end up on the sidelines. I frequently sigh and I rhetorically question whether” This is my world?”

I frequently sigh and I rhetorically question whether” This is my world?”

Yes, this is my world. Countless times I have had my, “What If ” moments. My conclusion is always the same,” It Is What It Is.”

My world with a chronic illness has taught me priceless life lessons of empathy and sympathy. I really need to learn to properly mourn my loses and move on. Unfortunately, what I need to mourn always seems to change.

I really need to learn to properly mourn my losses and move on. Unfortunately, what I need to mourn always seems to change.

You can read more about HypoGal and Everyday Life, Here.

Resource: 1.  http://www.more.com/relationships/marriage-divorce/how-marriage-survives-when-one-partner-gets-sick?page=2

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