What Is the Difference Between Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income?

photo (28)What Is the Difference Between Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income?

Life with a chronic illness can easily lead to financial ruin, bankruptcy.

 A large portion of the HypoGal EMails I receive are from chronically ill individuals who are frustrated and confused about the different types of government benefits the United States government offers.

So, in this HypoGal Blog I will try to highlight:

What are the differences between Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Insurance?

Social Security Disability Insurance a.k.a. S.S.D.I:

Administered by the Social Security Administration and is funded through payroll taxes.

• Offer cash benefits for individuals who are blind or have a disability.

• To receive SSDI you must have worked a certain amount of year and you must have make contributions to the Social Security trust fund.

• Social Security Disability Benefits are paid only after you have been disabled a continuously five month waiting period. Disability Benefits are paid the beginning of the sixth month your disability began.

You are not entitled to benefits for any period of time during your five month waiting period.

• Under Social Security Disability Insurance the spouse and children of a disabled person who receives SSDI is eligible to receive partial dependent benefits, called auxiliary benefits.


  Supplemental Security Income a.k.a. S.S.I. :

• Is a government program that is strictly need-based and is funded by the general tax fund. • Offer cash benefits for individuals who are blind or have a disability.

• To receive SSI you must show need and have limited financial resources.

• Live in the United States, be a U.S. citizen or national or in one of certain categories of aliens.

Approval for benefits usually takes three to six months. Once you SSI application is approved you will receive your benefits retroactive to the date of your application.

• If you have a disability or blindness that prevents you from working you it is possible to receive SSI earlier. However, you must meet all SSI requirements.

• In most states, beneficiaries that receive SSI are automatically eligible for Medicaid.

 

Additional Resources: Understanding Supplemental Security Income SSI Income — 2014 Edition Understanding Supplemental Security Income SSI And Other Government Programs — 2014 Edition Frequently Asked Questions About Government Disability Programs

 

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